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The Recipes

 

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Gin Cocktails


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Alaska Cocktail

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Alaska Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Gordon's London Dry Gin

1 oz. Green Chartreuse

4 dashes Bittercube Orange Bitters

Garnish

Lemon twist

Alaska Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Alaska Cocktail Story

The Alaska, first appearing in the 1914 publication Drinks by Jacques Straub, is an austere cocktail that flew mainly under the radar with bar patrons. It remained popular enough among bartenders and cocktail recipe collectors, however, to warrant multiple recipe recordings over several decades. From Harry Craddock’s 1930’s Savoy Cocktail Book through Gary Regan’s 2003 tome, The Joy of Mixology, the Alaska follows a deceivingly simple recipe. Comprised of gin, yellow Chartreuse, and orange bitters, the Alaska requires a truly adept bartender to perform the delicate balancing act of mixing an assertive gin with the honeyed, botanical notes of the French liqueur. Curiously, the Alaska has always called for dry gin though it was born of the pre-Prohibition era when old tom gin ruled.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Arsenic and Old Lace Cocktail

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Arsenic and Old Lace Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Bluecoat Gin

1 oz. Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth

0.25 oz. Rothman & Winter Crème de Violette

half barspoon Vieux Carré Absinthe

Garnish

Lemon twist

Arsenic and Old Lace Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist or orange twist.


Arsenic and Old Lace Cocktail Story

Joseph Kesselring’s famous play Arsenic and Old Lace opened in 1941, around the same time a cocktail of the same name appeared in a little known publication entitled Crosby Gaige’s Cocktail Guide and Ladies’ Companion. The Arsenic and Old Lace honors an old tradition of cocktails crafted and advertised alongside theater performances. Containing both absinthe and violette, it winks to the darkly comedic edge of the play while creating a wholly unforgettable, herbaceous take on the Martini.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Aviation Cocktail

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Aviation Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Tanqueray Gin

0.25 oz. Luxardo Liqueur Maraschino

0.25 oz. Rothman & Winter Crème de Violette

0.5 oz. Fresh lemon juice

0.25 oz. Simple syrup

Garnish

Lemon twist

Aviation Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry and an orange twist if desired.


Aviation Cocktail Story

The original Aviation was a crisp gin sour, flecked with the blue haze of a sunny sky. Hugo R. Ensslin created the drink at New York’s Wallick hotel in 1916, at a time when both cocktails and luxury air travel were enjoying somewhat of a golden age. Its crucial ingredient, and also what lent the drink its mesmerizing color, was crème de violette, a French liqueur that fell into obscurity stateside as Europe plunged into conflict. Subsequent recipes, like the one found in the Savoy Cocktail Book, omitted the violette altogether. An Aviation without violette was simply a sour made with Maraschino liqueur, hardly exciting and certainly inelegant. Thanks to the current revival of lost spirits, the production of violette has widely expanded. Bartenders can now replicate not only the Aviation according to the original recipe, but a whole slew of other forgotten violette cocktails such as the Arsenic and Old Lace.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Bee’s Knees Cocktail

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Bee’s Knees Cocktail Ingredients

1.5 oz. Bluecoat Gin

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

0.75 oz. Honey syrup

Garnish

Lime wedge

Bee’s Knees Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with a lime wedge.


Bee’s Knees Cocktail Story

The etymology of the term "bee's knees," meaning swell, sweet, or just great, traces back to the 1920s, which is the same time a cocktail of the same name popped up. While the Prohibition-era cocktail has no definitive creator, references appear in William Boothby's World Drinks and How to Mix Them (1934) and Trader Vic's Bartender's Guide (1947). There are also tales of Frank Meier serving the drink at Paris's Ritz Hotel in the '20s, as he had a habit of tailoring cocktails geared specifically towards American expats and tourists. While the bare bones original version was likely created to mask poor quality gin, it's Frank Meier's balanced recipe that more closely resembles a Bee's Knees you would want to enjoy today. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Bijou Cocktail

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Bijou Cocktail Ingredients

1.75 oz. Plymouth Gin

0.75 oz. Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth

0.75 oz. Green Chartreuse

Garnish

Orange twist

Bijou Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with an orange twist.


Bijou Cocktail Story

A gem of a drink with a long history, the Bijou—meaning “jewel” in French—is an herbaceous mix of gin, vermouth, and Chartreuse. First appearing in print in 1892 in Harry Johnson’s Bartender’s Manual, the Bijou is deceptively simple to make: mix the three spirits, and pour over ice. Top with a cherry, as was called for in the 1892 recipe, or for an elevated taste, add expressed orange or lemon peel. The Bijou also sometimes appears, as in C. F. Lawlor’s 1884 book, The Mixocologist, with gin, Grand Marnier, and sweet vermouth. Though the the drink has wavered in popularity over the last century, it’s an intoxicating classic sure to impress any gin aficionado. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Bramble Cocktail

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Bramble Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Bluecoat Gin

0.5 oz. Giffard Cassis Noir De Bourgogne crème de cassis

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

Garnish

Berries

Bramble Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients except crème de cassis in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a Collins glass, rocks glass, or mug. Top with ice. Slowly pour crème de cassis over the top. Garnish with seasonal berries, dark fruits, or jams.


Bramble Cocktail Story

Invented and named by Dick Bradsell in 1984, bartender at London’s Fred’s Club, the Bramble falls somewhere between a gin fix and a cobbler. A liberal drizzling of crème de mûre, a French blackberry liqueur, finishes off the cocktail along with fresh seasonal fruit - preferably blackberries. Envisioning the Bramble as a sort of scaled-down British Singapore Sling, Bradsell selected crème de mûre as the fruit element as it reminded him of picking wild blackberries on the Isle of Wight during the summer. The basic format lends itself to endless riffing with different combinations of gins, liqueurs, and fruits, making the Bramble not just the perfect summer drink, but adaptable to all seasons. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Breakfast Martini

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Breakfast Martini Ingredients

2 oz. Tanqueray Gin

0.5 oz. Cointreau

0.5 oz. Fresh lemon juice

1 barspoon Orange marmalade

Garnish

Orange slice

Breakfast Martini Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist or orange wheel.


Breakfast Martini Cocktail Story

Falling into the unofficial genre of things that go into Martini glasses that are not Martinis, the Breakfast Martini deservedly stands out from many other fruity concoctions that find their way into oversized v-shaped glasses. Created around 1996 by veteran bartender Salvatore Calabrese at the Library Bar in London, the Breakfast Martini revolves around the bright, bitter, and jammy qualities of an orange marmalade you might have over toast for breakfast. By incorporating a citrus-forward dry gin and Cointreau along with fresh lemon juice, Calabrese created a modern eye opener: a widely appealing, balanced cocktail that was meant to be imbibed with breakfast. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Bronx Cocktail

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Bronx Cocktail Ingredients

1.75 oz. Beefeater London Dry

0.5 oz. Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth

0.25 oz. Dolin Dry Vermouth

1 oz. Fresh orange juice

4 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters

Garnish

Orange twist

Bronx Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or double rocks glass and add ice if desired. Garnish with an orange twist or orange slice if desired.


Bronx Cocktail Story

Johnnie Solon was tending bar at the Waldorf Astoria in 1906 when a customer ordered "something new." Grabbing a few oranges, some vermouth, and gin, Solon shook up a light, refreshing afternoon cocktail, coined thereafter as the Bronx. Johnnie was considered one of the Waldorf's most creative professionals—the Bronx was the first cocktail to use orange juice as the sole citrus component. The drink became just as, if not more, popular than the Manhattan, though it appealed to an entirely different palette. William Boothby immortalized the recipe in 1908 by printing it in his book, World's Drinks and How to Mix Them. Though it seemed that cocktails bearing the names of New York's boroughs were popular on that trend alone, the Bronx has endured thanks to its bold ingenuity.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Corpse Reviver #2 Cocktail

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Corpse Reviver #2 Cocktail Ingredients

1 oz. Bombay Sapphire London Dry Gin

0.75 oz. Lillet Blanc

0.75 oz. Cointreau

3 dashes Pernod Absinthe

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Corpse Reviver #2 Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry and an orange twist if desired.


Corpse Reviver #2 Cocktail Story

The reigning champion of eye openers, less a category of cocktail than a method of consuming alcohol, the refreshingly botanical Corpse Reviver #2 first appeared in Harry Craddock’s Savoy Cocktail Book in 1930. Eye openers were the mid-1800s equivalent to hair of the dog, a hangover antidote meant to get one going after a long night of drinking. Craddock can be credited with canonizing the less celebrated #1 along with the notorious #2 as proper cocktails, meant to be served up and imbibed quickly. Kina Lillet, the long extinct fortified wine called for in the original recipe, can be substituted with Cocchi Americano, an Italian aperitif wine that adequately replicates the bitter quinine notes found in the the original cocktail. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Casino Cocktail

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Casino Cocktail Ingredients

1.75 oz. Ransom Old Tom Gin

0.75 oz. Luxardo Liqueur Maraschino

2 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters

0.5 oz. Fresh lemon juice

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Casino Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry or lemon twist.


Casino Cocktail Story

Hugo R. Ensslin served this gin-forward, violette-less Aviation variation while tending bar at the short-lived Wallick Hotel in New York City. His original recipe appeared in the 1917 publication Recipes for Mixed Drinks, which covered every pre-Prohibition concoction he served at his bar. While the book was published to little immediate fanfare, Harry Craddock plucked a majority of Ensslin’s recipes, adding them to his 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book


 
 

Gin Cocktails

French 75 Cocktail

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French 75 Cocktail Ingredients

1.25 oz. Beefeater London Dry

0.5 oz. Simple syrup

0.5 oz. Fresh lemon juice

Sparkling wine

Garnish

Lemon twist

French 75 Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients except sparkling wine in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass and top with sparkling wine. Garnish with a lemon twist.


French 75 Cocktail Story

Anecdotal history often recounts that the French 75 was named after the 75-millimeter cannon used by the French artillery in the First World War, yet that credit belongs to a boozy calvados and gin cocktail that was listed as a 75 in Harry McElhone’s 1922 publication ABC’s of Mixing Cocktails. McElhone credited that version to the Buck’s Club in London. The French 75, as we know it now, appeared in Judge Jr.‘s Here’s How in 1927, its recipe more resembling typical Champagne and gin concoctions of the 1800s than the makeup of the 75. It was a celebratory drink, after all, so the Champagne version stuck. It became a wildly popular drink in post-War Europe and, subsequently, in post-Prohibition America, after it appeared in the 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book. British and French victors alike sometimes prepared the drink with Cognac instead of gin. It was this version that became the namesake cocktail of the Arnaud’s French 75 Bar in New Orleans.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Gibson Cocktail

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Gibson Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Gordon's London Dry

1 oz. Martini & Rossi Extra Dry Vermouth

Garnish

Cocktail onions

Gibson Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with cocktail onions.


Gibson Cocktail Story

Is a Gibson anything more than a Martini with a garnish of pungent, garlicky pickled onions? The myriad of urban myths proclaiming its origin, all tied to the mid-century’s political elite and high society, skip over its first appearance in William Boothby’s 1908 guide The World’s Drinks and How to Mix Them. This recipe, however, simply described a Martini made with dry gin and dry vermouth, without bitters. Since tracing the history of the Martini is never easy, the onion was not the garnish in the Gibson, but in a forgotten 1912 cocktail called the “Hanford Cocktail.” As olives and lemon twists became more popular garnishes for cocktails that resembled Gibsons but were just called Martinis instead, the Gibson reluctantly took on the obscure and eccentric mantle that was the Hanford Cocktail. So is the Gibson a cocktail in and of itself, or not? It is, above all, an order, and a very deliberate one at that. No onion, no Gibson.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Gimlet Cocktail

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Gimlet Cocktail Ingredients

1.75 oz. Plymouth Gin

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

0.75 oz. Fresh lime juice

Garnish

Lime wedge

Gimlet Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass and add ice if desired. Garnish with a lime wedge.


Gimlet Cocktail Story

Originally made with gin and lime juice to ward off scurvy while at sea, the gimlet’s clean flavor profile soon captured the hearts of civilians like Raymond Chandler, whose character Philip Marlowe says, in the 1953 novel The Long Goodbye, that “a real gimlet is half gin and half Rose’s lime juice and nothing else.” Like Bond’s Vesper Martini, the Gimlet permeated the cultural vernacular, appearing in the zeitgeist time and time again (see: Mad Men). Modern interpretations include altering the ratio of Rose’s or eliminating it altogether, instead incorporating a combination of fresh lime juice and simple syrup to taste. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Gin Rickey Cocktail

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Gin Rickey Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Ransom Old Tom Gin

0.75 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

Soda

Garnish

Lime wedge

Gin Rickey Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients except soda in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a Collins glass and add ice. Top with soda. Garnish with a lime wheel or lime wedge.


Gin Rickey Cocktail Story

While legendary cocktails were being crafted at popular drinking holes throughout the Northeastern United States in the late 1800s, Washington D.C. quietly harbored a secret of its own: Shoomaker’s and its house specialty, the Rickey. The bar was less a civilized tavern than a boisterous marketplace of hooch and ideas all the same, frequented by all manner of lawmakers, military personnel, journalists, and traders. The star bartender in the establishment’s heyday was George A. Williamson, who credited the Rickey to the former Confederate colonel Joseph Kyle Rickey. Rickey’s order was actually just a bourbon on the rocks with soda, though patrons of Shoomaker’s soon became fond of adding lemons and limes to the drink. Joseph Rickey bought the bar in 1883 and began importing citrus as well, all while acting as a lobbyist on Capitol Hill. Several versions of his Joe Rickey made their way up to esteemed New York City bars such as the Waldorf Astoria. The most popular variation, the Gin Rickey, made with old tom gin, was first mentioned in Harry Johnson’s 1882 Bartender’s Manual


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Hanky Panky Cocktail

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Hanky Panky Cocktail Ingredients

1.5 oz. Beefeater London Dry Gin

1.5 oz. Dolin Sweet Vermouth

0.5 oz. Fernet Branca

Garnish

Orange twist

Hanky Panky Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with an orange twist.


HANKY PANKY Cocktail Story

Credited to Ada Coleman, bartender at the Savoy Hotel in London around the turn of the century, the Hanky Panky came about as a casual bartender’s choice cocktail when actor and regular customer Charles Hawtrey requested an off-the-cuff drink. Hawtrey bestowed his go-to order its slang-of-the-time moniker. Coleman was not only one of the few female bartenders to pen a lasting classic during this period, she garnered and maintained a position coveted by many of her peers: that of head bartender at the Savoy. Though this was Coleman’s sole contribution to the Savoy Cocktail Book, her role in shaping the hotel’s reputation for hospitality is legendary. The Hanky Panky saw a resurgence in popularity as Fernet Branca made its way into the hands of West Coast bartenders in the early 2000s. If cocktails made with fernet were thought to be unpalatable, one simply needed to track down this obscure classic.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Income Tax Cocktail

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Income Tax Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Gordon's London Dry

1 oz. Fresh orange juice

0.25 oz. Martini & Rossi Vermouth Rosso

0.25 oz. Martini & Rossi Extra Dry Vermouth

2 dashes Angostura Aromatic Bitters

Garnish

Orange wheel

Income Tax Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange wheel.


Income Tax Cocktail Story

First appearing in Harry Craddock’s 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book, the Income Tax owes its existence to the more celebrated Bronx cocktail, created in 1906 by Waldorf Astoria bartender Johnny Solon. Solon’s drink was a novel and delicate mix of fresh orange juice, gin, and two vermouths. The addition of bitters to the Bronx cocktail likely went a long way in earning this variation its own name. Just as the Bronx had only an anecdotal relation to the Bronx Zoo, it’s not likely that the Income Tax owes anything to the Internal Revenue Service.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Jasmine Cocktail

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Jasmine Cocktail Ingredients

1.5 oz. Tanqueray Gin

1 oz. Cointreau

0.5 oz. Campari

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

Garnish

Lemon twist

Jasmine Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Jasmine Cocktail Story

A tart and bitter cousin to that icon of 1990s cocktail culture, the Cosmopolitan, the Jasmine was created by Paul Harrington at the Townhouse Bar & Grill in Emeryville, California, a seaside suburb of the San Francisco Bay area. The Jasmine appeals to drinkers seeking a comfortable middle ground between a Negroni and a White Lady, or perhaps simply a quaffable summertime sour. Harrington contributed to the craft cocktail revolution with his 1998 recipe collection of classic and original cocktails titled Cocktail: The Drinks Bible for the 21st Century


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Last Word Cocktail

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Last Word Cocktail Ingredients

0.75 oz. Tanqueray Gin

0.75 oz. Green Chartreuse

0.75 oz. Luxardo Liqueur Maraschino

0.75 oz. Fresh lime juice

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Last Word Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.


Last Word Cocktail Story

In the 1920s, while the rest of the country packed itself into speakeasies to drink bathtub gin and smuggled whiskey, gentlemen at the exclusive Detroit Athletic Club were quietly imbibing a perfectly balanced cocktail made with exotic ingredients. The Last Word, with its wildly unconventional marriage of Chartreuse and Maraska cherry liqueur, remained relatively absent from the canon of classic cocktails, enjoyed solely by those in the know. Vaudevillian Frank Fogarty is thought to have introduced the drink to the New York bar scene. Ted Saucier finally penned the recipe for the Last Word in his 1951 publication Bottoms Up, which bartender Murray Stenson happened to be leafing through while tending bar at Seattle’s Zig Zag Cafe in the mid 2000s. By placing the drink on the bar’s menu, Stenson finally brought the Last Word out from the obscurity of venerable high society and into the hands of adventurous drinkers from coast to coast.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Martinez Cocktail

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Martinez Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Ransom Old Tom Gin

1 oz. Cinzano Sweet Vermouth

4 dashes Scrappy's Orange Bitters

1 barspoon Lazzaroni Liquore Maraschino

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Martinez Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.


Martinez Cocktail Story

The Martinez has a murky origin story, with recipes differing wildly from one bar to the next. Legend has it that Jerry Thomas, pioneer bartender at a hotel near Martinez, California, created the combination of gin, sweet vermouth, bitters, and Curaçao for a traveler making his way to the small frontier town of the same name. The drink appears, dedicated to the traveler, in the 1887 reprint of his Bartender’s Guide. The town of Martinez, however, has long claimed that the drink was created and served in the town, not in honor of the town. Other stories say the Martinez is a twist on a Manhattan, or a version of a Martini, but whatever the story, the recipe has evolved over time, calling for gin, sweet vermouth, orange bitters, and maraschino instead of Curaçao.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Martini

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Martini Ingredients

2 oz. Plymouth Gin

1 oz. Dolin Dry Vermouth

Garnish

Lemon twist
Olive

Martini Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with a lemon twist or olive.


Martini Story

Dry, dirty, or perfect, shaken or stirred, the Martini has evolved in preparation and style over the past century. Recipes including the base spirit combination of gin and vermouth started appearing in bar manuals in the late nineteenth century as the Martinez or some similar concoction. Some credit the bartender at the Knickerbocker Hotel for first serving the dry Martini to the likes of John D. Rockefeller in 1911, giving it a reputation as the drink of choice of financial power brokers. Others believe that the Italian Martini and Rossi vermouth products, imported in the US since the 1870s and growing over time to include Martini Rosso, Martini Extra Dry, and Martini Bianco, inspired the name and modern spin on the sophisticated cocktail. 50/50 An even split of gin and vermouth, this variation of the Martini grew in popularity as higher quality spirits like Plymouth and London dry gins evolved from and replaced the juniper-based genever historically used with bitters for cocktails like the 50/50’s predecessor, the Martinez. 2:1 The ratio of two parts Plymouth gin and one part French dry vermouth mixed with orange bitters first appeared as the Marguerite in Thomas Stuart’s 1896 guide, Stuart’s Fancy Drinks and How To Mix Them. As the Martini became more and more commonplace, bartenders played with the proportions, eventually finding that the 2:1 of gin to vermouth provided the happy medium most modern Martini drinkers sought when ordering the classic cocktail at the bar dry. The dry Martini, served with less vermouth and more gin, appears under the misnomer of the Martinez in 1904’s American Bar: Recettes des Boissons Anglaises et Américaines. Through the early 20th century, the dry Martini was essentially a 50/50 with dry vermouth, until Prohibition and World War II negatively impacted the US vermouth supply.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Monkey Gland Cocktail

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Monkey Gland Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Gordon's London Dry Gin

1 barspoon Mansinthe

1 oz. Fresh orange juice

0.5 oz. Grenadine

Garnish

Orange twist

Monkey Gland Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with an orange twist.


Monkey Gland Cocktail Story

For a testament to how American palettes differed in the past, look no further than the Monkey Gland. Ritz Hotel bartender Frank Meier created the mix of gin, orange juice, absinthe, and grenadine to entice thirsty American tourists into an evening of imbibing at his Parisian bar. Though the drink also appears in Harry McElhone’s 1930 publication, Harry’s ABC’s of Mixing Cocktails, newspapers were sounding off about the popular cocktail as early as 1923. The 1927 publication Barflies and Cocktails reveals that the standard recipe called for equal parts gin and orange juice - perhaps a novel pairing at the time, but a risky bid to sell to a modern drinking public raised on more sour concoctions. Yet with balanced measurements, and careful attention paid to the quality of orange juice and grenadine used, the Monkey Gland lends itself to slyly showcasing the complex interplay of absinthe in a shaken gin cocktail. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Negroni Cocktail

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Negroni Cocktail Ingredients

1 oz. Plymouth Gin

1 oz. Campari

1 oz. Cinzano Sweet Vermouth

Garnish

Orange twist

Negroni Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a glass. If serving with ice, use a double rocks glass. If serving without ice, use a coupe glass. Garnish with an orange twist.


Negroni Cocktail Story

The godfather of apéritifs, the Negroni is a bold mix of gin, sweet vermouth, and Campari. The sophisticated drink is often credited to Italian Count Camillo Negroni, who, in 1919, requested a stronger version of the Americano cocktail with gin, minus the soda water, while at the Caffé Casoni in Florence. The endlessly riffable template of equal parts spirit, bitters, and fortified wine provided opportunities for drinks like the Old Pal to enter the cocktail scene. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Old Maid Cocktail

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Old Maid Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Bombay Sapphire London Dry Gin

1 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

6-8 Loose mint leaves

3 slices Cucumber

Garnish

Fresh mint
Cucumber

Old Maid Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or double rocks glass and add ice if desired. Garnish with fresh mint and cucumber slices.


Old Maid Cocktail Story

Invented by Sam Ross in 2004 at Milk and Honey in New York City, the Old Maid was conceived of as part of a whole family of easily modifiable cocktails. Though the Old Maid itself closely resembles a Southside cocktail, Ross crafted the drink to allow for the substitution of the base spirit without losing the essence of the original cocktail. This model of crafting cocktails would become one of the defining innovations of the early days of the modern cocktail renaissance.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Pegu Club Cocktail

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Pegu Club Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Beefeater London Dry Gin

0.75 oz. Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao

0.5 oz. Fresh lime juice

2 dashes Angostura Aromatic Bitters

2 dashes Angostura Orange Bitters

Garnish

Orange twist

Pegu Club Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.


Pegu Club Cocktail Story

The British-owned Pegu Club was a Victorian gentleman’s club which opened its doors in 1882 as a haven for gin-thirsty colonists in Rangoon, Burma. Unlike that other famous Pacific-Asian cocktail, the Singapore Sling, the Pegu Club cocktail was only enjoyed by a colonizing elite class. It would not see much popularity until decades later, when it appeared in Harry McElhone’s 1922 publication Harry’s ABCs of Mixing Cocktails. Audrey Saunders introduced a modernized version of the cocktail when she opened her Pegu Club in Manhattan in 2005. The reinvented version is a sour that still retains the dry, spiced bite of the original.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Pink Lady Cocktail

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Pink Lady Cocktail Ingredients

1 oz. Tanqueray Gin

0.75 oz. Laird's 7.5 Year Old

0.75 oz. Grenadine

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

1 Egg white

Garnish

none

Pink Lady Cocktail Preparation

Separate the egg whites from the yolk and place the whites in a shaker. Add the remaining ingredients. Combine tins without ice and shake hard for fifteen seconds. Add ice and shake very hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed glass. Allow the meringue from the egg to rise to the top and set in a thick layer.


Pink Lady Cocktail Story

Invented by Jacques Straub and first appearing in his 1913 publication of Manual of Mixed Drinks, the Pink Lady suffered from a series of misrepresentations that worked to mar its popularity over time. Straub’s recipe is a tart and fruity sour made with a unique and unconventional combination of gin and apple brandy. Later recipes, especially those recorded by English bartenders, added egg whites and omitted apple brandy, likely due to the near impossibility of acquiring an American-made spirit during Prohibition. In the post-Prohibition decades, the Pink Lady was unfairly maligned for appealing only to female drinkers, despite its similarity to gentleman’s club favorites like the Clover Club. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Quill Cocktail

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Quill Cocktail Ingredients

1 oz. Plymouth Gin

1 oz. Campari

1 oz. Cinzano Sweet Vermouth

4 dashes Vieux Carré Absinthe

Garnish

none

Quill Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a rocks glass and add ice.


Quill Cocktail Story

Little is known of the Quill cocktail’s history. Similar in profile to a Negroni, with a touch of absinthe for herbal balance, the Quill first appears in beloved bartender Harry McElhone’s Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails, credited to theatrical press agent Frank C. Payne. Payne founded the Theatrical Press Agents of America organization, and published the promotional The Quill magazine. While McElhone was known to credit his patrons for some concoctions, there’s no definitive proof whether Payne prompted the invention, or Harry simply dedicated the drink to him.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Ramos Gin Fizz Cocktail

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Ramos Gin Fizz Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Plymouth Gin

1 oz. Heavy cream

0.5 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.5 oz. Fresh lemon juice

4 drops Orange flower water

Egg white

Soda

Garnish

none

Ramos Gin Fizz Cocktail Preparation

Separate the egg whites from the yolk and place the whites in a shaker. Add the remaining ingredients except soda. Combine tins without ice and shake hard for fifteen seconds. Add ice and shake very hard. Fine strain into a Collins glass. Top with soda. Allow the meringue from the egg to rise to the top and set in a thick layer.


Ramos Gin Fizz Cocktail Cocktail Story

Arguably the most notorious New Orleans classic, the Ramos gets its name from its sole creator: Henry C. Ramos, a bartender known for his professional poise and intolerance for drunk fools as much as he was for his impeccably made cocktails. What made a Ramos distinct from a run of the mill fizz? Orange blossom water and heavy cream, both respectively imparting a floral aroma and a silky texture. But it was the environs the fizzes were imbibed in that was unique in itself - Ramos‘ bar, the Imperial Cabinet Saloon, was civil with never a drunk in sight and shut its doors early in the evening. Ramos fizzes became so popular at the time that a team of young “shaker boys” would do nothing but shake cocktails all throughout the evening. And they would shake for a very, very long time. The Ramos demands a thorough whipping to come out perfectly creamy. Similarly to other gin cocktails popularized in the late 1800s, the gin used in a Ramos was Old Tom gin. After Henry Ramos made his last original fizz on the eve of prohibition, our palette and demand for the sweet, sophisticated gin dwindled. The Ramos is typically made with London dry gin these days, but if the drink is made with any respect at all, it is shaken for a very, very long time. 


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Singapore Sling Cocktail

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Singapore Sling Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Plymouth Gin

0.5 oz. Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao

0.5 oz. Cherry Heering

0.5 oz. Bénédictine D.O.M.

0.5 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.5 oz. Fresh pineapple juice

Soda

Garnish

Brandied cherry
Fresh mint
Tropical fruit

Singapore Sling Cocktail Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Combine all ingredients in a Hurricane or tall footed glass or tiki mug and add crushed ice. Swizzle, add more crushed ice, and swizzle again. Top with soda, then top with crushed ice. Garnish with a combination of mint and pineapple leaves, lime wedges and pineapple wedges, and brandied cherries.


Singapore Sling Cocktail Story

Mixed drinks classified as ‘slings’ in the late 1800s were easily assembled and highly adaptable creations, enjoyed as rich flips in cold climates and refreshing highballs in the tropics. Gin Slings were the refresher of choice throughout colonial Southeast Asia, but once Singapore Slings were served at the storied Raffles Hotel in Singapore, the drink would become a timeless icon of the Asian Pacific. The hotel credits Chinese bartender and renaissance man Ngiam Tong Boon with creating the drink in 1915. While gin slings reportedly had a pinkish appearance as early as 1903, likely due to the addition of cherry brandy, a key component of the Singapore Sling, Ngiam elevated the rustic sling into a sophisticated modern cocktail by mixing in bitters. The drink’s popularity endured into the 1920s, when a young traveler named Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt had a taste long before he appropriated the recipe into his Don the Beachcomber tiki empire.  


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Southside Cocktail

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Southside Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Beefeater London Dry Gin

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

0.75 oz. Fresh lime juice

8-12 Loose mint leaves

Garnish

Lime wheel
Fresh mint

Southside Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass and add ice if desired. Garnish with a lime wheel and fresh mint.


Southside Cocktail Story

A perfect summertime drink, the Southside combines mint, simple syrup, lime juice, and gin in a singular cocktail that symbolizes the leisure class. Many origin stories place the Southside in Prohibition-era Chicago, where a gang of bootleggers allegedly set out to make their hooch more palatable by mixing in fresh ingredients. However, the drink—evolving from a fizz—actually originated in the early 1890s at the Southside Sportsmen’s Club in Long Island, where Northeastern playboys congregated.  


 
 

Gin Cocktails

Tom Collins Cocktail

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Tom Collins Cocktail Ingredients

1.75 oz. Plymouth Gin

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

Soda

Garnish

Lime wheel

Tom Collins Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients except soda in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a Collins glass and add ice. Top with soda. Garnish with a lemon wheel or lemon wedge.


Tom Collins Cocktail Story

John Collins, a bar waiter at Limmer’s Hotel in London, made his eponymous cocktail in the early nineteenth century when he mixed carbonated water, a recent invention, into the genever punch that was commonly found in alehouses and inns. The juniper-based genever was a popular mixer, but as the spirit gave way to its successor gin, a cheaper and more plentiful option arrived on the bar scene: OId Tom gin. Old Tom gin became the go-to spirit for assembling the highball along with sugar, lemon, and soda, prompting the name change from “John” to Tom Collins.


 
 

Gin Cocktails

White Lady Cocktail

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White Lady Cocktail Ingredients

1.75 oz. Tanqueray No. 10 Gin

1 oz. Cointreau

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

1 Egg white

Garnish

none

White Lady Cocktail Preparation

Separate the egg whites from the yolk and place the whites in a shaker. Add the remaining ingredients. Combine tins without ice and shake hard for fifteen seconds. Add ice and shake very hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed glass. Allow the meringue from the egg to rise to the top and set in a thick layer. Garnish with expressed lemon oil if desired.


White Lady Cocktail Story

Credited to Harry McElhone while he was tending bar at London’s Ciro Club, the White Lady first appeared in his Harry’s ABCs of Mixing Cocktails in 1929, though his recipes changed wildly over time. Back in London, around 1919, he was making a sour with crème de menthe and Cointreau as a base. By the time he was tending bar at Harry’s New York in Paris, he swapped out the crème de menthe for gin, which would earn the drink’s publication in Harry Craddock’s 1930 Savoy Cocktail Book. Harry’s simple and light gin-based recipe would become the standard, however many New York City bartenders who brought the drink back into vogue in the mid-century added egg white, elevating the cocktail to an ethereal classic.