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The Recipes

 

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Whiskey Cocktails


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Blended Scotch

Affinity

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Ingredients

2 oz. The Famous Grouse Scotch

0.5 oz. Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth

0.5 oz. Dolin Dry Vermouth

4 dashes Angostura Aromatic Bitters

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.


Cocktail Story

Following in the footsteps of the Manhattan and the Rob Roy, the Affinity is a Scotch-lover’s dream developed by Hugo Ensslin, bartender at the Hotel Wallace, who documented the recipe in 1916 in his influential cocktail manual, Recipes for Mixed Drinks. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Algonquin

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Ingredients

2 oz. Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey Bottled-In-Bond

0.75 oz. Dolin Blanc Vermouth

0.75 oz. Fresh pineapple juice

Garnish

Pineapple wheel

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Strain into a double rocks glass. Garnish with pineapple wheels.


Cocktail Story

The Algonquin, named for New York’s Algonquin Hotel, is less a celebrated classic cocktail of the golden age than a symbol of the namesake hotel’s fascinating contradictions. The hotel’s owner, Frank Case, was a supporter of the temperance movement and preemptively dried out the hotel before the Volstead Act even went into effect. Nonetheless, the hotel’s dining room became a beacon for a rotating social circle of high-minded literary figures and journalists who became known as the Algonquin Round Table. Frank Case openly hosted writers both famous and unknown, offering ample room and discounted meals. Despite the fact that cocktails were not served at the Round Table, it was perhaps inevitable that an eponymous drink would pop up elsewhere as a tribute to the storied club, which included the likes of Harpo Marx and Dorothy Parker. Presumably, the popularity of rye whiskey during Prohibition made this iteration of the Algonquin the one that prevailed. Like many drinks created during Prohibition, the Algonquin skewed sweet and bared little resemblance to any classic cocktails. This was the kind of tangible effect of hundreds of professionally trained bartenders fleeing the Prohibition-era United States for boozier pastures. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Irish Whiskey

Blackthorn

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Ingredients

2 oz. Bushmills Irish Whiskey

1 oz. Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth

3 dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters #6

3 dashes Vieux Carré Absinthe

Garnish

Orange twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.


Cocktail Story

First appearing in Harry Johnson’s 1900 publication of Bartender’s Manual, the Blackthorn bears an undeniable resemblance to the king cocktail of the turn of the century, the Manhattan. Following suit of other so-called improved cocktails, the Blackthorn calls for several dashes of absinthe, which acts as an herbaceous foil to a mellow, malty Irish Whisky. The cocktail fell victim to both the First World War and Prohibition, a time in which Irish Whisky was extremely hard to come by in the United States. Due to the whisky shortage, several recorded recipes replaced the base spirit with English sloe gin, giving a literal edge to the drink, since sloe gin is made from English blackthorn berries. Harry Craddock ensured the original recipe survived by including it in his 1930 publication of the Savoy Cocktail Book. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Blinker

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Ingredients

2 oz. High West Double Rye Whiskey

1 oz. Fresh grapefruit juice

0.5 oz. Raspberry syrup

Garnish

Grapefruit wheel

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Strain into a double rocks glass. Garnish with grapefruit wheels.


Cocktail Story

The Blinker was likely created by Patrick Gavin Duffy, bartender at the Ashland House in New York City. Duffy published the recipe in his 1934 publication The Official Mixer’s Manual. Though the Ashland House was pouring drinks throughout the early 1900s, the pragmatic simplicity of the Blinker hints at it being a Prohibition creation. Grenadine and raspberry syrup were considered interchangeable alternatives for one another in many drink recipes recorded in the early turn of the century. While Duffy’s version calls for grenadine, cocktail historian Ted Haigh insists on the superior effect that raspberry syrup has on the drink. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Blended Scotch

Blood and Sand

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Ingredients

0.75 oz. The Famous Grouse Scotch

0.75 oz. Cherry Heering

0.75 oz. Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth

0.75 oz. Fresh orange juice

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.


Cocktail Story

Inspired by the 1922 film of the same name, which features Rudolph Valentino as a matador, the Blood and Sand is a layered scotch sipper stained a deep red color, thanks to the generous incorporation of Cherry Heering. Appearing, entirely uncredited printed in 1930’s Savoy Cocktail Book, the equal-parts recipe has a dramatic effect, its smoky scotch and blood-red color still a clever nod to the film’s fatal finale.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Blended Scotch

Bobby Burns

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Ingredients

2.25 oz. Chivas Regal Scotch 12 yr.

1 oz. Cinzano Sweet Vermouth

0.25 oz. Bénédictine D.O.M.

Garnish

Lemon twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe glass and add ice. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Cocktail Story

The Bobby Burns is a pre-Prohibition cocktail with a complicated history and myriad printed interpretations that appear throughout the years. Harry Craddock’s Bobby Burns recipe in 1930’s Savoy Cocktail Book most closely resembles a Rob Roy with Bénédictine, however a year later, a Robert Burns appears in the Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book, penned by Albert Stevens Crockett. This cocktail features dashes of absinthe instead of Bénédictine. While Craddock’s recipe suggests the drink was invented in England, perhaps in honor of the famed Scottish poet, the Waldorf Astoria’s Robert Burns seems more to be an homage to the New York City-based cigar manufacturer. While the peculiar similarity in names between the two cocktails may have simply been in the interest of laying local claim to the drink, ultimately, they both yield distinctly different results. Later recipes even suggest substituting Drambuie for Bénédictine, however, the original Savoy recipe is largely considered to be the superior preparation of the cocktail, whether you spell it Bobby, Bobbie, or even Robert. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Bourbon

Boulevardier

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Ingredients

1.5 oz. Four Roses Bourbon Yellow Label

1 oz. Campari

0.75 oz. Dolin Sweet Vermouth

Garnish

Orange twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.


Cocktail Story

Famous bartender Harry McElhone served the Boulevardier in Paris in the late 1920s to frequent patron Erskinne Gwynne, the editor of a New Yorker-esque publication called The Boulevardier. McElhone made a common practice of dedicating drinks to his customers, who were perhaps themselves the cocktail’s original creators, from the other side of the bar. This cocktail, which appears in both McElhone’s Harry’s ABCs of Mixing Cocktails (1925) and Barflies and Cocktails (1927), hearkens back to a Negroni or Old Pal, and is easy to lighten or deepen in flavor, depending on the amount of Campari used.  


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Bourbon

Brown Derby

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Ingredients

2 oz. Buffalo Trace Bourbon

0.75 oz. Fresh grapefruit juice

0.75 oz. Honey syrup

Garnish

none

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass.


Cocktail Story

The star cocktail to emerge from the Vendome Club, owned by Hollywood Reporter founder Billy Wilkerson,the Brown Derby was named after a chain of iconic Derby hat-shaped diners once located throughout Los Angeles - one of which was near the Vendome. In its heyday, the Vendome Club was the epicenter of Hollywood gossip and off-screen drama. While patrons likely frequented the Vendome to see and be seen rather than sample cocktails, the Brown Derby’s bittersweet mix of honey and grapefruit became an instant classic, earning its appearance in 1933’s Hollywood Cocktails. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Blended Scotch

Cameron’s Kick

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Ingredients

1 oz. Chivas Regal Scotch 12 yr.

1 oz. Jameson

1 oz. Fresh lemon juice

0.75 oz. Orgeat syrup

Garnish

Fresh mint

Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Combine all ingredients in a Hurricane or tall footed glass or tiki mug and add crushed ice. Swizzle, add more crushed ice, and swizzle again. Top with crushed ice. Garnish with fresh mint or a lemon wheel.


Cocktail Story

This pleasing, nutty sour featuring blended scotch, Irish whiskey first appeared in Harry McElhone’s Harry’s ABCs of Mixing Cocktails. We recommend searching for something with a good amount of peat to complement the maltiness of an Irish whiskey. With proportions that more resemble a balanced Whiskey Sour, the nuttiness of this drink shines through, highlighting the transportive qualities that orgeat can bestow on a simple drink. The Cameron’s Kick is a discreet midway point between the minimalism of the Japanese Cocktail and the opulence of a Mai Tai.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

De la Louisianne

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Ingredients

2 oz. Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey Bottled-In-Bond

0.75 oz. Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth

0.5 oz. Bénédictine D.O.M.

4 dashes Vieux Pontarlier Absinthe

4 dashes Peychaud's Bitters

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.


Cocktail Story

Known alternatively as Á la Louisiane, or simply La Louisiane, this criminally under-ordered cocktail captures the essence of its birthplace, New Orleans, with alternating sweet and herbaceous tones. First stirred up at the Restaurant La Louisiane, and only published in 1937 in Stanley Clisby Arthur’s New Orleans Drinks and How to Mix ‘Em, La Louisiane expertly combines American ingredients like whiskey with French ingredients like Bénédictine, a centuries-old herb-based liqueur. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Diamondback Lounge

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Ingredients

1.75 oz. Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey Bottled-In-Bond

0.75 oz. Yellow Chartreuse

0.5 oz. Laird's 7.5 Year Old

Garnish

Lemon twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a double rocks glass. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Cocktail Story

First appearing in Ted Saucier’s 1951 publication of Bottoms Up!, the Diamondback Lounge was a staple at the Diamondback Cocktail Lounge, located within the venerable Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland. Locally, a diamondback referred not to the deadly rattlesnake species, but to the diamondback terrapin turtle, which doubled as the University of Maryland's endearing mascot. While no credit is given to a single individual for inventing the drink, the inspired split-base of rye whiskey and apple brandy certainly hints at a prideful embrace of all things Northeastern. The inclusion of Chartreuse where one would expect to find vermouth is, if anything, typically characteristic of the way stirred cocktails were evolving during the early mid-century. Saucier calls for the yellow 80-proof expression of Chartreuse in his version of the Diamondback Lounge, which works to temper and balance the other two fiery spirits found within; mix two bottled-in-bond spirits with high-proof green Chartreuse, and you’re asking for one of the more potent cocktails out there.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Hot Toddy

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Ingredients

2 oz. Bulleit Rye

4 oz. Soda

0.5 oz. Honey syrup

Garnish

Lemon wheel
Candied ginger

Preparation

Heat mug with boiling water for five minutes. Dump water. Add honey, whiskey, and hot water. Garnish with a lemon wheel and candied ginger.


Cocktail Story

The tradition of mixing spirits with boiling hot water as a fortifying cure-all goes back well before Jerry Thomas ushered in the modern Hot Toddy in his 1862 bartender’s guide, How to Mix Drinks, or the Bon-Vivant’s Companion. This practice was used medicinally to treat colds in Scotland in the 1700s, naturally with Scotch Whisky. In the mid-1800s, a doctor named Robert Bentley Todd made similar prescriptions, mixing Western spirits like brandy or whiskey with hot water and exotic Eastern spices like cinnamon and cloves, coveted for the health-promoting qualities their aromatics effuse. The addition of vitamin-rich citrus and honey for palatability likens the drink to a hot punch. While medicinal breakthroughs have since rendered this tradition obsolete, Hot Toddies are still the perfect antidote to cold winter nights, whether or not you feel an ache in your bones.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Improved Whiskey Cocktail

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Ingredients

2 oz. High West Double Rye Whiskey

0.5 oz. Luxardo Liqueur Maraschino

3 dashes Bitter Truth Aromatic Bitters

3 dashes Duplais Verte

Garnish

Lemon twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a double rocks glass and add ice. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Cocktail Story

The Whiskey Cocktail originally appeared in Jerry Thomas's 1887 Bartender's Guide as an "unimproved" version, optionally "improved" by Maraschino and absinthe. The improved category of drinks emerged when cocktail innovation became a prolific practice. The improved classification could be applied to any cocktail containing fancy liqueurs or spirits that elevated the standard combination of base spirit, bitters, and sugar. As bartenders grew more and more creative with their concoctions, bar patrons began clarifying whether they meant the old-fashioned or improved version of the Whiskey Cocktail. A modern recipe for the official Improved Whiskey Cocktail can be found in David Wondrich's 2007 tome, Imbibe!


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Manhattan

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Ingredients

2.25 oz. Old Overholt Rye Whiskey

1 oz. Cinzano Sweet Vermouth

4 dashes Angostura Aromatic Bitters

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.


Cocktail Story

Though its exact origins are difficult to pinpoint considering the drink has been on the bar circuit since the 1860s, the Manhattan is, without a doubt, a truly New York invention. A common theory credits the Manhattan Club with the invention of the classic cocktail in honor of an 1874 party hosted by Lady Churchill, however Lady Churchill was actually in England at the time, giving birth to her soon-to-be-famous son Winston. Then there are those who believe the city itself inspired the drink. The recipe in William Schmidt’s 1892 book, The Flowing Bowl, including gum and absinthe, has more in common with a rustic Improved Whiskey, but it also set the stage for the evolution into a simple yet sophisticated drink. During Prohibition, when rye all but disappeared, Canadian whiskey became a common and palatable substitute for American ryes. Bourbon soon stole the spotlight at the center of the drink, however, rye has enjoyed a comeback in recent years. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Bourbon

Mint Julep

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Ingredients

2.25 oz. Blanton's Bourbon Single Barrel

8-12 Loose mint leaves

Garnish

Fresh mint

Preparation

Smack mint leaves between hands to release oils. Rub the inside of a Julep tin with mint leaves. Add the remaining ingredients to the Julep tin. Add ice, swizzle, and add more ice. Garnish with a mint bouquet.


Cocktail Story

The Mint Julep has deep roots in the American South, predating the cocktail by a long stretch. It is first mentioned in print in 1803, where it was described as a deceptively simple mixed drink that required specific starting components: strong liquor, fresh mint, quality ice, and a julep tin. Leave out any of these things, or try substituting them, and you’re well on your way to something that is, well, not quite a julep. Enjoyed by the upper class on long, hot, and uneventful, carriage rides across the South, juleps were often made with fine rum or brandy. Bourbon was the spirit of choice for poorer Southerners, and became the standard bearer for a proper Mint Julep. The turn of the century brought with it the age of the cocktail as well as the Prohibition, which led to the decline of those long-standing American drinks that relied on rustic simplicity. One tradition, however, held on strong: that of enjoying a Mint Julep or two in anticipation of the yearly Kentucky Derby. In 1938, the Mint Julep was deemed the official beverage of the Kentucky Derby, restoring the drink’s historical significance and solidifying its ties with the cultural heart of the American South. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Monte Carlo

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Ingredients

2 oz. Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey Bottled-In-Bond

0.25 oz. Bénédictine D.O.M.

3 dashes Bitter Truth Aromatic Bitters

Garnish

none

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a double rocks glass and add ice if desired.


Cocktail Story

First appearing in Hyman Gale & Gerald F. Marco’s 1937 publication The How and When, the Monte Carlo most closely resembles an Old Fashioned cocktail. With the mellow, botanical notes of Bénédictine shining through, the simple harmony of the Monte Carlo's ingredients made it the perfect scaffa, an outdated style of mixed liqueur drink, served sans ice. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Old Fashioned

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Ingredients

1 oz. Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey Bottled-In-Bond

1 oz. Old Overholt Rye Whiskey

4 dashes Angostura Aromatic Bitters

4 dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters #6

0.25 oz. Rich simple syrup

Garnish

Orange twist
Lemon twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a double rocks glass and add ice. Garnish with lemon and orange twists.


Cocktail Story

Originally called the Whiskey Cocktail when this basic mix of whiskey, bitters, and sugar first appeared in Jerry Thomas’s 1862 Bartender’s Guide, the Old Fashioned has withstood the test of time due to its rustic simplicity. In the nineteenth century, cocktails were named simply after their main spirits: consider, for example, the Brandy Cocktail or the Genever Cocktail. When bartenders started mixing in different combinations of spirits, like absinthe, maraschino or Curaçao, fans of the old Whiskey Cocktail began asking for the “old fashioned” version of the classic drink. Prohibition prompted muddling new fruits to mask the flavor of cheap booze, and eventually, soda water even made its way into the recipe post-World War II, distancing the Old Fashioned from its own origins. The craft cocktail revival of recent years has inspired a return to the Old Fashioned’s roots, with most contemporary bars serving only the simplest and highest quality ingredients for a true taste of the past. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Old Pal

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Ingredients

1.5 oz. Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey Bottled-In-Bond

1 oz. Dolin Dry Vermouth

0.75 oz. Campari

Garnish

Orange twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist or orange twist.


Cocktail Story

A twist on a twist of the classic Negroni formula, the Old Pal is an incredibly austere rye whiskey cocktail. Along with the Boulevardier, the Old Pal is part of the original group of cocktails concocted by American expats living in Europe following the Prohibition. The popular Paris bar owner Harry McElhone created the crisp drink, dedicating it, as he so often did, to one of his friends. The Old Pal, in Harry's case, referred to New York Herald reporter William Robertson, whose name appears alongside the recipe in McElhone's 1922 tome, Harry’s ABCs of Mixing Cocktails.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Blended Scotch

Presbyterian

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Ingredients

2 oz. Cutty Sark Scotch

Ginger beer

Garnish

Lime wheel
Candied ginger

Preparation

Combine all ingredients except ginger beer in a Collins glass. Top with ginger beer and add ice. Garnish with candied ginger and either a lime or lemon wedge.


Cocktail Story

In the late nineteenth century, ginger ale and brandy were frequent bedfellows. As brandy all but disappeared due to a phylloxera vastatrix epidemic, the Scots got a little inventive, swapping in whiskey and carrying on with their ginger ale cocktails. Enter: the Presbyterian. Most likely named in jest of religious prudes who wouldn't touch a drink, the Presbyterian evolved over time to include ginger beer. A common way to order one at that time was to ask for a Mamie Taylor, which indicated that a squeeze of lime be added to the drink.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Rattlesnake

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Ingredients

1.75 oz. Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey

3 dashes Pacifique Absinthe Verte Supérieure

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

1 Egg white

Garnish

Lemon twist

Preparation

Separate the egg whites from the yolk and place the whites in a shaker. Build the rest of the ingredients in the opposite tin. Combine tins without ice and shake hard for fifteen seconds. Add ice and shake very hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass. Allow the meringue from the egg to rise to the top and set in a thick layer. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Cocktail Story

First appearing in Harry Craddock’s 1930 publication of the Savoy Cocktail Book, the Rattlesnake is essentially a classic rye whiskey sour with an added herbaceous kick thanks to a healthy dose of absinthe. This places its origin squarely in the improved category of cocktail, where an existing recipe was made more enticing by adding a fancy modifier, like absinthe, to the mix. The early-1900s ban on absinthe spread like wildfire throughout Europe and eventually hit American shores, resulting in a whole slew of cocktail recipes rendered obsolete before replacements like pastis and herbsaint came around. The Rattlesnake is just one example of many cocktails that failed to gain wide recognition during the golden age of the cocktail, in part due to the vast scale of the Savoy Cocktail Book. Fortunately, the reintroduction of absinthe to the American market circa 2007 ushered in a revived interest in forgotten absinthe cocktails. The Rattlesnake lives on as one of the most accessible absinthe-forward classics.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Remember the Maine

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Ingredients

2.25 oz. Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey

0.5 oz. Noilly Prat Sweet Vermouth

3 dashes Vieux Pontarlier Absinthe

1 barspoon Cherry Heering

Garnish

Lemon twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a glass. If serving with ice, use a coupe glass. If serving without ice, use a flute. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Cocktail Story

Remember the Maine is a most regal cocktail, named after the rhyme “Remember the Maine, to Hell with Spain,” commemorating the U.S.S. Maine which sunk off the coast of Havana in 1889 following a mysterious explosion. Most closely resembling a rich, cherry-flavored Manhattan, the cocktail is connected to yet another grand historical event: Charles H. Baker noted drinking it at Havana’s Hotel Nacional in 1933 during the first firing shots of the Cuban Revolution. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Blended Scotch

Rob Roy

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Ingredients

2 oz. The Famous Grouse Scotch

1 oz. Cinzano Sweet Vermouth

4 dashes Angostura Aromatic Bitters

Garnish

Brandied cherry

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.


Cocktail Story

Descended from the Manhattan, the Rob Roy was created in 1894 at the Waldorf Astoria when, according to the New York Times, a “good operetta” of the same name opened just down the street. Perhaps to honor the opera’s eighteenth-century Scottish folk hero, the Rob Roy calls for scotch instead of rye, a simple swap that has helped cement this classic’s lasting reputation as a balanced and accessible cocktail.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Sazerac

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Ingredients

1 oz. Rittenhouse Rye Whiskey Bottled-In-Bond

1 oz. Old Overholt Rye Whiskey

0.25 oz. Vieux Carré Absinthe

8 dashes Peychaud's Bitters

Garnish

Lemon twist

Preparation

Fill a double rocks glass with crushed ice and add absinthe. Combine the remaining ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Fully discard the contents of the double rocks glass. Pour the contents of the mixing glass into the double rocks glass and add ice. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Cocktail Story

One of the earliest documented cocktails incorporating absinthe, the Sazerac came about when New Orleans drugstore owner Antoine Amédéé Peychaud served his friends his own variation on a Brandy Cocktail using his famous Peychaud’s Bitters. Meanwhile, the Merchant’s Exchange Coffee House, a French Quarter bar, took Peychaud’s recipe and added a newly-imported French cognac called Sazerac-de-Forge et Fils, leading the locale to change its name to the Sazerac House. Eventual owner Thomas Handy added absinthe and substituted American rye instead of brandy, helping the Sazerac live on after a widespread pest epidemic devastated grapevines across France, causing an extreme shortage of brandy. When the 1917 ban on absinthe threatened to permanently eliminate the Sazerac from bar menus across the US, clever Cajuns saved the drink by swapping in Herbsaint, a locally manufactured anise liqueur with a flavor profile similar to absinthe. This ability to withstand the tests of time eventually led to the legislature-backed appointment of the Sazerac as the official cocktail of New Orleans in 2008.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Irish Whiskey

Tipperary

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Ingredients

1.5 oz. Redbreast 12 Irish Whiskey

0.75 oz. Green Chartreuse

0.75 oz. Noilly Prat Sweet Vermouth

Garnish

Lemon twist

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Cocktail Story

First appearing in Hugo R. Ensslin’s 1916 publication of Recipes for Mixed Drinks, the Tipperary marks one of the first significant entry points of Irish Whiskey’s participation in the classic cocktail canon. The 1914 song “It’s a Long, Long Way to Tipperary,” an iconic wartime song for Irish regiments, coincided with the drink’s popularity in bars throughout Europe. According to 1935’s The Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book, which catalogs drinks made as far back as 1897, the Tipperary has a slightly more mundane origin that predates the wartime song altogether, instead simply referring to a state in the middle of Ireland. The historical debate among mixologists, however, seems to revolve around proportions. The original equal-parts recipe appealed to an early 20th-century palate, while modernized interpretations of the drink tend to go heavier on the Irish Whiskey, pulling back on the chartreuse and vermouth. Though Irish Whiskey certainly never got the spotlight in the golden age of cocktails, the Tipperary proves the spirit’s versatility while appealing to a wide spectrum of tastes.


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Ward Eight

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Ingredients

2 oz. WhistlePig Straight Rye Whiskey 10 Year

0.75 oz. Fresh orange juice

0.5 oz. Fresh lemon juice

0.25 oz. Grenadine

Garnish

none

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass.


Cocktail Story

London bartender Robert Vermeire credits the creation of the Ward Eight to Boston bartender Tom Huisson in his 1922 book, Cocktails - How to Mix Them. Huisson tended bar at the Locke-Ober, one of the oldest standing taverns in Boston and the epicenter of mob activity during the late 1800s. In the Ward Eight, Huisson incorporated two novel turn-of-the-century ingredients in the same cocktail. Fresh oranges were exotic and expensive, and therefore less plentiful, while grenadine, a syrup made from pomegranate seeds, quickly became a fashionable alternative in recipes that called for raspberry or strawberry syrups. The Ward Eight endures as a calling card to those in the know of Boston’s old cocktail culture and remains one of the city’s most symbolic classics, embodying the dichotomy of organized crime sharing the same roofs as local watering holes throughout the city’s history. 


 
 

Whiskey Cocktails: Rye Whiskey

Whiskey Sour

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Ingredients

2 oz. Old Overholt Rye Whiskey

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice

1 Egg white

Garnish

none

Preparation

Separate the egg whites from the yolk and place the whites in a shaker. Add the remaining ingredients. Combine tins without ice and shake hard for fifteen seconds. Add ice and shake very hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed glass and add ice if desired. Allow the meringue from the egg to rise to the top and set in a thick layer. Garnish with expressed lemon oil if desired.


Cocktail Story

Formally introduced to the drinking populace in Jerry Thomas’ 1862 guide How to Mix Drinks, or The Bonvivant’s Companion, the Whiskey Sour is such a ubiquitous workhorse of a cocktail that it has survived several generations of bastardizations. Like the Daiquiri, it likely has roots in seafaring journeys. Also, like the Daiquiri, the core elements of the Whiskey Sour are so simple that seemingly any mix of citrus and brown booze might dare take its name. The original was likely made with rye whiskey, without the addition of egg white, but soda water, which most bartenders must have decided was a terrible idea, since it was removed in subsequent recorded recipes. While eggs were essential to drinks like nogs and flips, its role in a sour largely remained a matter of personal preference. Having survived the creative abuses of both prohibition and the cocktail dark ages of the 80’s, the Whiskey Sour largely remains an “egg white optional” order, but we would recommend it - whether using bourbon or rye, it works wonders in foregrounding the base spirit while imparting a velvety texture on the cocktail.