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The Recipes

 

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Rum Cocktails


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Aged Rum

Airmail Cocktail

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Airmail Cocktail Ingredients

1 oz. Ron Del Barrilito 3 Star Aged Rum

0.5 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.5 oz. Honey syrup

Champagne

Garnish

Lime wedge

Airmail Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients except Champagne in a shaker. Shake hard. Fine strain into a flute and top with Champagne. Garnish with a lime wheel or lime wedge.


Airmail Cocktail Story

For the salty personality out there who swears rum and champagne don’t mix, here’s a cocktail for you. First appearing in W.C. Whitfield’s 1941 publication Here’s How, the Airmail is yet another delicious and brilliant piece of marketing put out by Bacardi meant to evoke the newfound ease and luxury of correspondence by airliner. The Airmail appealed to that jet-set glamour the best way a drink can: with champagne on top. It later saw widespread popularity in American households when Esquire included it in its 1949 publication, Handbook for Hosts.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Cachaça

Caipirinha Cocktail

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Caipirinha Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Avuá Cachaça Prata

2 barspoons Granulated sugar

1 Lime quartered

Garnish

none

Caipirinha Cocktail Preparation

Add sugar and lime wedges into tin set and muddle. Add cachaça and ice. Shake hard. Pour into a double rocks glass without straining.


Caipirinha Cocktail Story

The Caipirinha’s humble beginnings as the traditional drink of field workers in the rural Brazilian countryside led to its naming; meaning “little hick” in Portuguese, Brazil’s national cocktail features the rum-like cachaça, sugar, and lime. Distilled from pressed sugar cane, cachaça is a bold spirit that, combined with muddled lime, sugar, and ice, becomes a surprisingly refreshing drink. The rustic drink is commonly elevated with the incorporation of seasonal fruits and homemade syrups.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

Cuba Libre Cocktail

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Cuba Libre Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Plantation White Rum 3 Stars

Coke

Garnish

Lime wheel

Cuba Libre Cocktail Preparation

Pour rum into a Collins glass. Top with Coke. Add ice. Garnish with a lime wheel or lime wedge.


Cuba Libre Cocktail Story

What distinguishes a Cuba Libre from the ubiquitous rum and coke? Charles H. Baker decried the necessity of squeezing a lime wedge at the bottom of the glass before adding anything else in 1934’s The Gentleman’s Companion. But there’s more: the Cuba Libre Baker was referring to goes back to at least 1900, to Havana during the Spanish-American War. “Cuba Libre!” was indeed the celebratory rallying cry behind Americans and Cubans alike, who could be found clanking refreshing glasses of Cuban rum and American Coca-Cola in the local bodegas. Coca-Cola was, of course, a different product back then, made with kola nut and coca extract from Peru. Cuban rum was also widely available and continued to be popular throughout the World Wars until the embargo era of the ‘60s, when the fear of nuclear war had Americans shouting “Cuba Libre!” no longer. Despite the changes in Coca-Cola recipes and the shuffling of political relations, the rum and coke remains a wildly popular duo. As for the Cuba Libre, our best approximation to recreate the original is to experiment with quality Cola, your favorite aged rum, and of course, that squeeze of lime. 


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

Daiquiri Cocktail

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Daiquiri Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. El Dorado Rum 3 Year

1 oz. Fresh lime juice

1 oz. Simple syrup

Garnish

Lime wedge

Daiquiri Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with a lime wedge.


Daiquiri Cocktail Story

Similar to the Caipirinha or the Mojito, the Daiquiri also calls for rum, sugar, and lime. The drink is thought to be named after a Cuban village, where American engineer Jennings Cox, who was positioned at a nearby iron mine, first wrote of tasting it in his travel diaries. The cocktail’s popularity spread to America, most believe thanks to Navy Admiral Lucius W. Johnson, who sampled the drink during a visit to Cuba, and introduced it to officers at Washington D.C.’s Army and Navy Club. The Daiquiri soon enraptured everyone from Ernest Hemingway to JFK, inspiring variations galore. Don't let the deceptively simple ingredient list fool you, however: making a proper Daiquiri requires skill with dilution acidity, and sugar, not to mention finesse. It's the egg test for the bar world, a basic standard all great bartenders strive to perfect.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

Daisy de Santiago Cocktail

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Daisy de Santiago Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Bacardí Gran Reserva Maestro de Ron

0.5 oz. Yellow Chartreuse

1 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.75 oz. Simple syrup

Soda

Garnish

Lime wedge
Fresh mint

Daisy de Santiago Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients except soda in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a Collins glass and add ice. Garnish with a mint bouquet and either a lime wedge or lime wheel.


Daisy de Santiago Cocktail Story

First appearing in Charles H. Baker’s 1939 publication of The Gentleman’s Companion, the rustic daisy specifically calls for the 40 proof yellow expression of Chartreuse, meant to be drizzled over cracked ice just before the cocktail is served. The author hailed the Daisy de Santiago as one of the best original classics to come out of the Bacardí house—we tend to agree.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Dark Rum

Dark ‘N’ Stormy Cocktail

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Dark ‘N’ Stormy Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Gosling's Black Seal Rum 80 Proof

0.75 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.75 oz. Ginger syrup

Soda

Garnish

Lime wheel
Candied ginger
Straw

Dark ‘N’ Stormy Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients except ice and soda in a shaker. Shake hard. Add ice and shake hard. Fine strain into a Collins glass and add ice. Top with soda and stir. Garnish with a straw and either a lime wheel or candied ginger.


Dark ‘N’ Stormy Cocktail Story

The Dark ‘N’ Stormy is one of the only a few cocktails in the world that can get you in legal trouble...if you’re not careful. Made with Gosling’s Black Seal rum, a dark, dark rum that’s been knocking sailors off their feet since 1806, and ginger beer over ice with a slice of lime, this quintessentially Caribbean delight just so happens to be registered under two patents with the US Patents and Trademark Office. The official cocktail of Bermuda should only be made with Gosling’s, as other dark rums are criminal to use, both due to the law and also since they don’t impart anywhere close to the level of flavor that Gosling’s does.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Rhum Agricole

Egg Nog

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Egg Nog Ingredients

2 oz. Rhum J.M Agricole Blanc

4 oz. Egg nog

Garnish

Cinnamon stick

Egg Nog Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker. Dry shake for 15 seconds. Add ice and shake hard. Fine strain into a snifter, coupe, or stemmed glass. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.


Egg Nog Story

Long before becoming a winter staple in the United States, egg nog was a luxury only the European elite enjoyed. The American tradition of nog was an offshoot of a rustic English drink known as a posset: less a proper cocktail than a way to consume warm milk fortified with booze during the colder months. Adding eggs as well as exotic spices like cinnamon and nutmeg made the drink an even more expensive treat, though in colonial North America, these formerly rare provisions were just a trip to a trader or farmer away. Thus the posset caught on in America’s taverns, consumed in wooden beer tankards known as nogs. The Colonies’ main trade, rum, was the spirit of choice for a fresh egg nog, as reflected in a 1775 poem. Though egg nog was traditionally served piping hot—softly curdling the eggs—industrial dairy advances like pasteurization and widespread refrigeration allowed the drink to keep longer and be served cold, transforming the drink into one of the most popular signifiers of holiday cheer.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

El Presidente Cocktail

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El Presidente Cocktail Ingredients

1.5 oz. Bacardí Gran Reserva Maestro de Ron

1.5 oz. Noilly Prat Dry Vermouth

1 barspoon Senior Curaçao of Curaçao Orange Liqueur

1 barspoon Grenadine

Garnish

Brandied cherry

El Presidente Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass and add ice. Stir 25-35 times. Strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with a brandied cherry.


El Presidente Cocktail Story

One of the few stirred-rum cocktails to emerge from the golden years of American tourism in Havana, Cuba, the El Presidente is a cocktail that requires fierce attention to measurements and ingredients if one wants to avoid stirring up an unpalatable booze bucket. A quality Cuban rum is key in doing this cocktail justice. Historical recipes call for varying amounts of both Curaçao and grenadine, however the El Presidente should be above all rich and velvety, not fruity or sweet. Grenadine, a pomegranate syrup featured in many other rum cocktails from the same era, is largely a background player in this drink. The presidente of the recipe is either Mario García Menoca or Gerardo Machado, rulers of Cuba from the mid-1910s and 1930s, respectively. The cocktail saw its heyday throughout the reign of Machado in the 1920s, a time when out-of-work American bartenders were forced to make careers for themselves abroad while Prohibition ran its course. Though it may be a relic of its time, the El Presidente remains a fascinating window to the mixing potential of rum beyond the usual suspects of citrus and sugar.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

Fog Cutter Cocktail

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Fog Cutter Cocktail Ingredients

1 oz. Santa Teresa Claro

0.25 oz. Bombay Sapphire

1 oz. Fresh lemon juice

0.5 oz. Fresh orange juice

0.5 oz. Orgeat syrup

Dry sherry

Garnish

Tropical fruit
Fresh mint
Orange wheel

Fog Cutter Cocktail Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Combine all ingredients except sherry in a Hurricane, tall Collins, or footed glass and add crushed ice. Swizzle, add more crushed ice, and swizzle again. Top with crushed ice. Drizzle sherry over the top. Garnish with a refreshing combination of mint and pineapple leaves, orange wheels, orchids and a paper umbrella.


Fog Cutter Cocktail Story

Forget debating who created the original Mai Tai: Don the Beachcomber had to bring in the cavalry to claim ownership of the original Fog Cutter. Bartender Tony Ramos, a member of the original bar team at Don’s Los Angeles restaurant, cites Edna Earl’s Fog Cutter restaurant as the inspiration for the drink. Trader Vic, however, published a recipe for the drink in 1947, years before Edna took over the venerable establishment. But the Fog Cutter restaurant, named after a deadly diving knife, was a steakhouse - hardly evocative of a tropical haven. Whoever served it first, the Fog Cutter certainly encapsulates the peculiarity of mid-century West Coast gastronomic glamour. Both Don and Vic’s recipes call for rum, brandy (Don preferred pisco,) gin, and a float of sherry, resulting in a creamy and bright alternative to other spice-heavy potions from the tiki catalogue.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

Hemingway Daiquiri

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Hemingway Daiquiri Ingredients

1.75 oz. El Dorado Rum 3 Year

0.75 oz. Lazzaroni Liquore Maraschino

0.75 oz. Fresh lime juice

Garnish

Lime wheel
Grapefruit wheel
Brandied cherry

Hemingway Daiquiri Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a a rocks, coupe, or stemmed cocktail glass and add ice if desired. Garnish with a combination of a lime wedge or wheel, grapefruit wheel or twist, and brandied cherry.


Hemingway Daiquiri Story

In the 1930s, Ernest Hemingway spent most of his time in Havana, writing in his apartment and drinking down the street at the El Floridita bar. El Floridita was the same spot where legendary bartender Constantino Ribalaigua was slinging the best daiquiris around. Hemingway’s preferred daiquiri, affectionately referred to as the “papa doble,” contained no sugar and double the rum. The house recipe for Hemingway’s daiquiri evolved over time to include grapefruit juice and maraschino liqueur, which, in balanced measurements, offers a funky, bitter play on the traditional daiquiri. Not one for moderate drinking, Hemingway held the house record of drinking seventeen in a single evening, while hanging at El Floridita with Guillermo, the famous pelota player Guillermo. In his defense, “there was no sugar in the drinks and we each ate two steak sandwiches.” He would boast about this night in letters to friends for years to come. 


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Aged Rum

Hot Buttered Rum

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Hot Buttered Rum Ingredients

2 oz. Santa Teresa 1796

0.25 oz. Demerara syrup

1 tbsp. Whipped Cream

6 oz. Hot Water

1 pad Butter batter

Garnish

Fresh grated nutmeg
Fresh grated cinnamon

Hot Buttered Rum Preparation

Heat mug with boiling water for five minutes. Dump water. Add syrup and whipped cream to the mug. Add rum. Top with hot water. Place pad of butter batter over the top. Garnish with cinnamon and nutmeg.


Hot Buttered Rum Story

Like the posset—warm milk fortified with spirits—before it, Hot Buttered Rum was born in Britain out of the desire to keep warm in the harsher winter months while simultaneously enjoying some hard liquor. In the 1600s, the American colonists, who faced similar unforgiving winters, really took to the drink, using up their abundant supply of rum. The lasting tradition of Hot Buttered Rum is partly due to its relatively simple preparation, which lends itself to improvisation. A simple mix of fresh butter, sugar, and spices along with a rum of choice is topped off with boiling water for the least taxing winter drink out there. Since butter is the only dairy element, the batter’s composition can be adjusted according to taste.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Aged Rum

Hotel Nacional Cocktail

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Hotel Nacional Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Bacardí Gold

1 tbsp. Rothman & Winter Apricot Liqueur

1 oz. Fresh pineapple juice

0.5 oz. Fresh lime juice

Garnish

Pineapple wedge

Hotel Nacional Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a pineapple wedge.


Hotel Nacional Cocktail Story

This elegant twist on the classic Daiquiri was created by former Waldorf Astoria bar manager Wil P. Taylor to match the baroque grandiosity of a brand new hotel property, built in Havana in 1930. The Hotel Nacional, which stood imposingly over a picturesque view of the harbor, was a hot spot for singers, actors, and writers from the moment its doors opened. While the 1933 revolution cut short the hotel’s glory days, Charles H. Baker, whose adventures seemed to always place him at the center of Latin American turmoil, documented Taylor carrying on conducting his bar with poise despite the political upheaval unfolding outside. Change inevitably came for the once idyllic expat haven. The Batista years brought cronyism and corruption to the Hotel Nacional, while World War II was just on the horizon with Cuba supporting the U.S. as an ally. Luckily for expat bartenders like Wil P. Taylor and the Casino Nacional’s Eddie Woelke, the end of Prohibition allowed their return home, where they could once again practice their craft, but with some new recipes up their sleeves.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Aged Rum and Rhum Agricole

Hurricane Cocktail

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Hurricane Cocktail Ingredients

1 oz. Appleton Estate Rum Reserve

1 oz. Rhum J.M Gold

1 oz. Fresh lemon juice

1 oz. Passion fruit syrup

Garnish

Paper umbrella

Hurricane Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add crushed ice. Shake lightly. Pour into a Hurricane glass. Add crushed ice, swizzle, and add more crushed ice. Garnish with a paper umbrella.


Hurricane Cocktail Story

The 1940s was Pat O’Brien’s decade of glory in New Orleans thanks to the invention of the Hurricane. The infamous concoction was named not after the category four hangover one might wake up with after drinking too many, but for the tulip-shaped kerosene lamps, dating back to the mid-1800s, that inspired the drink’s iconic and whimsical glassware. Though not directly connected to the tiki phenomenon, the Hurricane closely adhered to the convention of rum paired with exotic fruits and juices served tall with plenty of ice. Likely taking a cue from Don the Beachcomber, who had first taken advantage of surplus rum in the post-Prohibition age, Pat O’Brien too combined excess rum with fruit juice, creating a visually arresting drink to serve in his attractive hourglass-shaped vessels. The Hurricane signature blush red color is thanks to another item borrowed from the tiki playbook: fassionola. Broadly a codename for a tropical fruit syrup, fassionola varied in quality since many debated what it actually was and few would ever tell. O’Brien’s rouge-colored mix lent the drink a tart and invigorating edge ideal for surviving the New Orleans heat.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Dark Rum

Jet Pilot Cocktail

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Jet Pilot Cocktail Ingredients

1.5 oz. Hamilton Jamaican Black Rum

0.5 oz. Hamilton 151 Ov reproof Rum

0.5 oz. Rhum J.M Gold

0.5 oz. Velvet Farlernum

0.5 oz. Fresh grapefruit juice

0.5 oz. Fresh lemon juice

0.5 oz. Cinnamon syrup

3 dashes Duplais Verte

1 dash Bitter Truth Aromatic Bitters

Garnish

Mint bouquet

Jet Pilot Cocktail Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add crushed ice. Shake lightly. Pour into a tall pilsner glass and add crushed ice. Swizzle, add crushed ice, and swizzle again, add more crushed ice. Garnish with a mint bouquet or edible flowers.


Jet Pilot Cocktail Story

The Jet Pilot, credited to the notorious Hollywood socialite and womanizer Steven Crane, is an enduring example of Don the Beachcomber's influence on tiki drinks. After a failed movie career, a divorce with Lana Turner, and a stint abroad, Crane returned to Los Angeles in 1953 to open the Luau, a star-lit mecca of all things Polynesian. The Luau absorbed all the best elements of the country’s top tropical-themed bars, superseding them all and becoming the de facto center of tiki culture in the States. Inspired by Don's Test Pilot, itself a lighter-proof cousin to the Zombie, Crane invented the Jet Pilot at the Luau in 1958. That the Jet Pilot shares a likeness to one of Don’s drinks is no accident. The two good friends were also kindred spirits, with mysterious personas and Hollywood hobnobbing a common thread. Though the Luau has since closed, the original Jet Pilot lives on at old-school tiki meccas like the Mai Kai in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Dark Rum

Jungle Bird Cocktail

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Jungle Bird Cocktail Ingredients

1 oz. Cruzan Black Strap Rum

0.5 oz. Smith and Cross Traditional Jamaican Rum

0.5 oz. Campari

1.25 oz. Fresh pineapple juice

0.5 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.5 oz. Simple syrup

Garnish

Tropical fruit
Tropical flowers

Jungle Bird Cocktail Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Combine all ingredients in a Hurricane, tall Collins, or footed glass and add crushed ice. Swizzle, add more crushed ice, and swizzle again. Top with crushed ice. Garnish with a refreshing combination of pineapple leaves, a pineapple wedge, an orange wheel, a lime wheel, a brandied cherry, orchids and a paper umbrella.


Jungle Bird Cocktail Story

Created around 1978 at the Aviary Bar in Kuala Lumpur, the appropriately named Jungle Bird was a throwback to the mid-century tiki craze of decades prior. The Jungle Bird calls for a hefty amount of the Italian bitter Campari, an ingredient seldom seen in tropical drinks, which acts as a sturdy foil to the excessive amount of pineapple juice. Though the recipe Jeff "Beachbum" Berry discovered calls for dark Jamaican rum, New York City bartender Giuseppe Gonzalez has popularized Cruzan Blackstrap rum as the base spirit. By tweaking the recipe to downplay the pineapple juice and harness the molasses and coffee notes of the Black Strap, Gonzalez has pushed the flavor profile into more extreme territory. The Jungle Bird remains an ideal template for testing the bold flavors of the most pungent rums out there.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Aged Rum

Mai Tai Cocktail

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Mai Tai Cocktail Ingredients

0.75 oz. Appleton Estate Rum Reserve

0.75 oz. Rhum J.M Gold

0.5 oz. Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao

0.5 oz. Cruzan Black Strap Rum

1 oz. Fresh lime juice

0.5 oz. Orgeat syrup

0.25 oz. Simple syrup

Garnish

Tropical fruit
Tropical flowers

Mai Tai Cocktail Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add crushed ice. Shake hard. Pour into a tiki mug. Add crushed ice, swizzle, and add more crushed ice. Garnish with a refreshing combination of pineapple leaves, a pineapple wedge, an orange wheel, a lime wheel, a brandied cherry, orchids, and a paper umbrella.


Mai Tai Cocktail Story

A workhorse of Trader Vic's cocktail catalogue, the Mai Tai is essentially a rum daisy with the addition of orgeat syrup. Both Trader Vic and Don Beach claim to have originated the rather simple tiki recipe, however Trader Vic continued to aggressively defend ownership of the cocktail for decades after the tiki craze faded. Where Vic undoubtedly deserves credit is in the incorporation of a truly inspired rum choice, the now-extinct seventeen-year Wray and Nephew. The Mai Tai has enjoyed the lasting power of an endless summer, in part due to its catchy name, which translates roughly to "very good" in Tahitian. The playful cocktail has also endured thanks to its wild popularity in Hawaii from the 1950’s to the present, where bartenders with tiki fever bestow the Mai Tai moniker on any drink with fruit juices and an umbrella.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

Mary Pickford Cocktail

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Ingredients

2 oz. Brugal Especial Extra Dry

1 oz. Fresh pineapple juice

0.25 oz. Lazzaroni Liquore Maraschino

0.25 oz. Grenadine

Garnish

Pineapple wedge

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass. Garnish with a pineapple wedge.


Cocktail Story

Named after the pioneering American film icon, the Mary Pickford Cocktail was likely created in 1922 when America’s sweetheart visited Cuba with her husband Douglas Fairbanks. Basil Woon’s 1928 publication When it’s Cocktail Time in Cuba credits the drink to Fred Kaufman, bartender at the Sevilla-Biltmore hotel in Havana. According to Woon, the Mary Pickford was as popular in its day as the El Presidente cocktail. Though many others claim credit for the drink, might it be possible that El Presidente creator Eddie Woelke crafted not one, but two original rum and grenadine cocktails?


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

Mojito

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Mojito Ingredients

2 oz. El Dorado Rum 3 Year

1 oz. Fresh lime juice

1 oz. Simple syrup

10-12 Loose mint leaves

Garnish

Fresh mint
Straw

Mojito Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Place mint leaves at the bottom of a Collins glass. Combine the remaining ingredients in the glass and add crushed ice. Swizzle, add ice, and swizzle again. Garnish with a mint bouquet and a straw.


Mojito Story

Legendary explorer Sir Francis Drake did more than just circumnavigate the globe. According to historians, Drake may also be the reason we have Mojitos today. When his crew came down with dysentery and scurvy on a Caribbean trip in the 16th century, local ingredients such as aguardiente (a rough-tasting predecessor of rum that translates to fire water) tempered with lime juice, sugar, and yerba buena mint provided a palatable natural remedy. Known as El Draque, after the explorer himself, this drink would change over time, eventually becoming the modern Mojito. Now made with white rum, sugar cane juice, and lime muddled with mint in a highball, the Mojito is reminiscent of a cool summer breeze.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Aged Rum

Old Cuban Cocktail

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Old Cuban Cocktail Ingredients

1.25 oz. Bacardí Gran Reserva 8 Year

0.5 oz. Fresh lime juice

2 dashes Angostura Aromatic Bitters

6-8 Loose mint leaves

Champagne

Garnish

Fresh mint

Old Cuban Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients except Champaign in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe glass or flute. Top with Champagne. Garnish with fresh mint.


Old Cuban Cocktail Story

One of Audrey Saunders’ most celebrated cocktails to come out of her Pegu Club in the mid-2000s, the Old Cuban, like the same sort you’d find playing dominoes in Little Havana, quietly evokes ages of stories and tradition. Harnessing the refreshing bliss of a Mojito and the elegance of an Airmail, the Old Cuban could be easily mistaken for one of the rum-driven classics to come right out of the best hotels in Havana during the 1930s. 


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Rhum Agricole

Painkiller Cocktail

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Painkiller Cocktail Ingredients

0.75 oz. Rhum J.M Gold

0.75 oz. Ron Del Barrilito 3 Star

1 oz. Fresh orange juice

1 oz. Coconut syrup

1 oz. Fresh pineapple juice

0.25 tsp. Fresh grated nutmeg

Garnish

Tropical fruit
Fresh grated nutmeg
Straw

Painkiller Cocktail Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Combine all ingredients in a Hurricane or tall footed glass or tiki mug and add crushed ice. Swizzle, add more crushed ice, and swizzle again. Top with crushed ice. Garnish with tropical fruits and fresh nutmeg.


Painkiller Cocktail Story

Originating in 1971 at the Soggy Dollar Bar on a remote British Virgin Island called Jost Van Dyke, the Painkiller’s future and reputation was forever changed when Pusser’s copyrighted the drink in 1981. That the drink was originally made with a blend of rums, and not the company’s funky, navy-style rum was all but forgotten when the company infamously filed a 2010 lawsuit against the beloved New York City tiki bar named after the cocktail, forcing the owners to erase any mention of the word Painkiller from their establishment. The ensuing backlash from bar owners may have hurt the brand, however it did little to dent the popularity of the drink itself, which is quite simply a rich variation of a Piña Colada. Indeed, part of the appeal of a Painkiller to the modern bartender may lie in deviating from the brand’s recipe, tinkering with different rums to approximate what the original may have tasted like. 


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Rhum Agricole

Piña Colada

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Piña Colada Ingredients

2 oz. Rhum J.M Agricole Blanc

1 oz. Fresh pineapple juice

1 oz. Coconut syrup

1 oz. Fresh lemon juice

Garnish

Pineapple wedge
Brandied cherry
Straw

Piña Colada Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Combine all ingredients in a serving glass and add ice. Swizzle, add ice, and swizzle again. Top with crushed ice. Garnish with a skewered brandied cherry, pineapple wedge, and a straw.


Piña Colada Story

The introduction of Coco López, a Puerto Rican product that is essentially sweetened coconut cream, sparked the invention of the modern Piña Colada. Thought to have been created by Ramon “Monchito” Marrero Pérez in 1954 while he tended bar at the Caribe Hilton Hotel in San Juan, the sweet blended treat we cherish on beach vacations today may actually be the legacy of nefarious pirates. The first documented version of the “strained pineapple” drink (the translated meaning behind piña colada) is a tangy combination of pineapple juice, coconut juice, and white rum that Puerto Rican pirate Roberto Cofresí allegedly gave his crew as positive reinforcement for piracy well done. 


 
 

Rum Cocktails: White Rum

Queen’s Park Swizzle Cocktail

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Queen’s Park Swizzle Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. El Dorado Rum 3 Year

1 oz. Fresh lime juice

1 oz. Simple syrup

4 dashes Angostura Aromatic Bitters

4 dashes Peychaud's Bitters

10-12 Loose mint leaves

Garnish

Fresh mint
Straw

Queen’s Park Swizzle Cocktail Preparation

Fill a Louis bag with ice and crush with a mallet. Place mint leaves at the bottom of a Collins glass or tall footed glass. Combine the remaining ingredients in the glass and add crushed ice. Swizzle, add more crushed ice, and swizzle again. Top with crushed ice. Garnish with a mint bouquet.


Queen’s Park Swizzle Cocktail Story

Many Caribbean islands from St. Kitts to Barbados claim ownership of the swizzle despite mentions of similar rum drinks as early as the 1780s. The Queen’s Park Swizzle in particular can be traced back to the Queen’s Park Hotel in Trinidad, where the typical combination of rum, sugar, and water was swizzled together with mint, then poured over crushed ice—a delicacy, in the early 1900s—and served to patrons of the resort. Over time, bitters made its way into the recipe, but even today, one sip of the Queen’s Park Swizzle can transport you to a white sandy beach with crystal clear waters all around.


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Aged Rum

Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Cocktail

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Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Cocktail Ingredients

2 oz. Mount Gay Rum

0.5 oz. Grand Marnier

0.5 oz. Velvet Falernum

1 oz. Fresh lime juice

1 tsp. Rich simple syrup

Garnish

Lime wheel

Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Cocktail Preparation

Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice. Shake hard. Fine strain into a coupe or stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a lime wheel.


Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Cocktail Story

First appearing in Crosby Gaige’s 1941 publication Cocktail Guide and Ladies’ Companion, this dry, subtly spiced variation on the classic Daiquiri is named after a private British yachting club dating back to 1844. After playing host to a series of competitive races in Bermuda throughout the century, the club settled down in the capital city of Hamilton in 1933, evolving into a permanent residential community. Trader Vic, who popularized a bolder, more contemporary take on the recipe in his Bartender’s Guide, must have been inspired by the nautical sense of adventure conjured up by the club’s history. Familiar elements from all over the Caribbean make this drink a minimalist gem destined for tiki mugs across America. 


 
 

Rum Cocktails: Aged Rum

Tom & Jerry Cocktail

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Tom & Jerry Cocktail Ingredients

12 Eggs

1 oz. Diplomatico Rum Extra Añejo Reserva

1 oz. Pierre Ferrand Ambre

2 cups Granulated sugar

1 tsp. Ground cinnamon

1 tsp. Ground allspice

1 tsp. Fresh grated nutmeg

0.5 tsp. Fresh grated mace

Garnish

Fresh grated nutmeg

Tom & Jerry Cocktail Preparation

Separate the egg whites from the yolk and place the whites in a large mixing bowl. Set the yolks aside. Beat the egg whites with an electric hand mixer. Gradually add sugar and spices. Beat the mixture to a stiff peak and fold in egg yolks. Beat until the egg yolks are fully incorporated. Combine rum, cognac and 1 tablespoon of batter in a mug. Top with hot water. Garnish with freshly grated nutmeg.


Tom & Jerry Cocktail Story

Likely created by British novelist Pierce Egan in the early 1800s, the Tom and Jerry was popularized by legendary bartender Jerry Thomas in his 1862 publication of How to Mix Drinks: or, the Bon-Vivant’s Companion. Thomas had the fortune of sharing a likeness to the drink by name, which resulted in a few amusing but likely fabricated anecdotes about how he named it. On paper, a Tom and Jerry might seem like an egg nog that requires a bit more finesse and labor, and that certainly isn’t wrong. A proper Tom and Jerry requires an intuition for temperature and fine technique that is usually practiced in a kitchen rather than behind a bar. When the egg batter, milk, and spirit are successfully integrated, the Tom and Jerry has a velvety froth that is unlike any egg nog recipe out there. Likely because of the intimidating nature of the preparation, the Tom and Jerry fell out of favor after the turn of the century, when cocktails quickly lapped punches in demand. Around the 1940s, the Tom and Jerry enjoyed an unlikely resurgence thanks to the popularity of ceramic bowl and mug sets bearing the name “Tom and Jerry” on the side of every glazed cup. These appeared during the period of tiki mugs and large animal-shaped decanters, all of which evoked a certain whimsical nostalgia for the things they represented. Perhaps they were meant to eulogize the lost practice of making a Tom and Jerry, but instead, the ceramic sets immortalized it, leading many home entertainers and cocktail historians alike to track down the forgotten recipes and reproduce them once again.